Friday, 11 July 2014

Survey results: 'What do you think is the most important thing we can do now?'

Following on from the previous post which reviewed the three questions asked by the survey and the answers to the first question, this post looks at the answers to the second:

Unlike the first question which used a multiple choice, this question took responses in comment form. You can find a large selection of the responses below, I have done a small amount of editing & reformatting to remove irrelevant comments and improve legibility.



What do you think is the most important thing we can do now?


  • Continue to raise awareness that the issue is not cyclists it's the traffic and the infrastructure that are inherently unsafe.
  • Set a short-term achievable goal to get the ball rolling, then push for long-term changes like building better infrastructure. 
  • Push the point that a win for cyclists is a win for car drivers. More cyclists on the road, means fewer cars and less traffic.
  • Ask for more funding for the cycle scheme. So much more needs to be done though if we want to be anywhere near other European cities like in Germany or Netherlands. More cycle lanes probably most important for now. 
  • Work on the safest solution. Any mixing of vehicles and cycles will continue to rest in death injury and distress. 
  • I think the fact that we've got a response shows that they are beginning to take this seriously. But the plans were still too vague, and we need to keep up the momentum.
  • Banning HGVs would give out the message that the roads aren't only there for drivers and that cyclists have a right to be safe.
  • Provide safest  roads cycling maps around London.
  • Keep up the media pressure through the media for change.  Publically hold any politician to account for failing to act.  Link inaction and deaths - and - crucially - serious accidents/injuries - to political inaction. Make it political, make them act to do the right thing.
  • Try to keep the campaign's profile high – it's probably getting less public attention than it was last year when several cyclists died in such a short period of time.
  • Campaign for it to be illegal to cycle without flourescent jackets and bicycles having proper front and rear lamps attached- not pathetic flickering or no lighting at all.  It is compulsory for motorcycles to be lit.  
  • Improve education for drivers with a campaign to highlight the rights of cyclists on the roads, i.e. not having to stick to the side of roads - there is so much aggression from drivers who wrongly believe cyclists are abusing the rules of the road when actually they're defending their right to cycle safely and without being crushed against the side of the road / cut up. 
  • Better use of pedestrian/cycle/road real estate. This will require a small investment to paint lines on the road or the pavement that allow a little additional space for cyclists. Hopefully this will encourage the more nervous cyclist that they have some of their own space.
  • Push for more segregated cycle lanes would be a priority, but ideally combined with more driver awareness targeting. I would suggest advertising e.g. on the back of buses. HGV driver awareness needs addressing but so does the awareness of other drivers in London. Minicab drivers are often terrible in their approach to cyclists.
  • Try to change the attitude of other road users (especially HGV and PCV drivers) toward cyclists. If everyone had an "inclusive"attitude toward each other - and this applies to cyclists as much - our roads would be the safer for it.
  • the number of people who tell me that they would never cycle in London astounds me. Some have even said it's suicidal. If we are going to overhaul cycling we need to make a step to ensuring that there are segregated cycle lanes and even better cycle only roads. We have pedestrianised numerous sections on London why not do the same for cyclists? 
  • Slow down all traffic and give more physical, segregated space to cyclists. 
  • The whole way that cycle lanes and traffic are safely and efficiently segregated needs to be rethought. We may be more congested, but we need to look at the Dutch approach. 
  • Pushing for clear changes in road infrastructure which ensure cyclists are, wherever possible, taken out of harm's way on the roads.
  • Make cyclists and HGV drivers more aware of the dangers and less willing to take risks. Infrustructure will take time and money but until then everyone needs to always be thinking about cycle safety at all times. The fewer deaths on the road, the more people will take up their bikes and the more impetus there will be to improve infrastructure.
  • fighting for cyclists, getting cyclists equal rights to drivers and pedestrians. And stopping the demonising of cyclists.
  • - Use examples from other countries with good cycling infrastructure to make comparisons and show up London's poor investment. 
  • Stiffer penalties too - some of the penalties for bad driving are so weak they hardly encourage good driving to be taken seriously,
  • Keep up the pressure and ensure that a single umbrella pressure group has the authority to negotiate on behalf of cyclists.
  • In terms of a specific issue: Ensure that the existing arterial routes into London are reinforced.  Segregated cycle-only lanes are okay for short/slow journeys or specific danger spots.  For the longer / faster bulk of London commuting journeys the concept of linked segregated facilites needs to clearly encompass bus lanes - these provide much-needed space for higher cycle numbers, but are not sufficiently continuous to serve as safe mass transit cycle routes.
  • Very large vehicles (articulated or outsized) should not be permitted to operate in central London at any time - except for approved major projects or activities. The reasons extend beyond cyclist safety - though that is one of the good ones. Other good reasons: environmental sustainability, removing one of the trade advantages of chains such as Tesco, who restock small Express shops with monster trucks, etc.
  • Better enforcement of the HW code. Motorised vehicles ride roughshod over vulnerable road users because they know there is no consequences.
  • Ban HGVs before 10am, after 4pm, until segregated lanes possible on 90% of CS routes is completed.
  • Keep up the pressure - there is a lot to change, and not much is happening to make those changes
  • In the short term cameras and safety provisions on HGVs may help.
  • In the long term I think both HGV drivers and cyclists need training. Cyclists need to be clear about when they are putting themselves at risk and how they can ride to control the traffic around them.
  • Part of the problem is the attitude cyclists have to other drivers as well as the public's attitude to cycling and cyclists in this country.
  • plan for a healthy future..take steps now to return streets to children, and make them clean and safe 
  • Make sure real, safe infrastructure is planned
  • Motor traffic reduction (in rat running) through residential streets via modal filters.
  • In my view, TFL, the mayor, and drivers need to acknowledge that mixed-use roads don't work. If we have proper, segregated cycle routes, then we don't need to worry about HGVs or speed limits on other routes. 
  • Cyclists need some better PR!
  • Combine voices with Stop Killing Cyclists - the current approach is allowing Gilligan to play divide and rule. Pushing for similar aims using the same routes a very short time period apart is just not helpful!
  • On the Spot fines for pedestrians or drivers who insist on walking, driving or parking in cycle lanes, and make more cycle lanes. Every highway repair or build project to spend 20% of its budget making new cycle lanes. Every Planning Application to require mandatory provision for Cycle racks (e.g. 1 cycle rack for every 2 car parking spaces. Lastly STOP TfL from spending SO MUCH MONEY on Bureaucracy...Cycle Lanes, not reports, studies, guides, leaflets, pamphlets, TV ads, Radio Ads, magazine ads, Focus groups, meetings etc. PHYSICAL STRUCTURE, NOT BUREAUCRATIC WAFFLE!
  • Get HGVs banned in busy commuter hours.
  • Look at other working systems with decent cycle lanes to see how it could work in London.
  • Safe segregated cycling lanes, shutting off roads in central London to provide real cycling infrastructure. anything else is not enough.
  • Traffic calming measures have resulted in narrow lanes for cars and extra wide pavements for pedestrians. We can all think of hundreds of examples of this around London. With a little paint we could claim this extra road space and double the amount of segregated cycle lanes overnight!  Cyclists don't kill pedestrians. Cars and lorries kill cyclists.
  • Lobby for cyclists to have access to wide pavements. 
  • Lobby to ban HGVs in central London during peak commuting hours. This will have positive impacts for everyone.
  • Implementing this sort of policy will boost cycling levels in London by making it much safer to cycle, which will have positive implications for public health and transport services. But the truth is everyone will win - all commuters, whether walking, cycling, driving or sitting on a bus, will be exposed to lower levels of air pollutants which are known to come from heavy goods vehicles. It will reduce traffic congestion which is good for everyone. And we all know that cycling makes employees happier, healthier and more productive so increased levels of it are good for businesses too!
  • Focus on closing rat runs in as many areas as possible. Each one of these is a small, important win that can be achieved in the short term for very little money.
  • Grab more media attention!
  • Segregated cycle lanes are the most important medium term goal, and some of your other measures should be promoted in the interim - e.g. banning HGVs would be good right now, and they could be reallowed once proper segregated cycle lanes are in place
  • Join with the London Cycling Campaign and produce a meticulously researched response to Gilligan. Details on how each fatality happened so that we can stop cyclists being blamed (eg by going through red lights or not wearing a helmet – which is useless against HGVs)  LCC are already campaigning for safer cycling so it makes sense to join forces.
  • every new junction alteration in every London district should have to describe what provision is made for cyclists the same way building permission has to address safety and environmental concerns. Every new set of traffic lights should include a green bike 'go' light to coincide with the green pedestrian light
  • Raise public awareness of the issues
  • Improving existing cycle paths so that they're fit for use and making dedicated separate cycle lanes. 
  • Bring in pedestrians, schools, parents, ordinary residents and push for 20mph on all residential streets. It must have commitment to be enforced. They will then become better for all and safer for all without any impact on business etc. This brings in the casual, of to the shops, cyclists. It also takes the focus off cycling as such, with all the red light jumping, pavement riding, not paying road tax (sic) etc. nonsense, and changes it to liveable streets for all, car and lorry drivers included.
  • Simultaneously we can campaign for the through routes, for commuting and for serious cyclists.
  • I think there should be more training for HGV drivers
  • Keep up the pressure. 
  • Push for all 'cycle lanes' to be physically-segregated cycle-only areas. i.e. no car parking on them, and no incursion by moving vehicles.    
  • HGVs are not road safe. It's as simple as that.
  • If they were a new vehicle that had just been invented, they wouldn't be allowed on the roads are they are not safe.
  • Therefore I think that they should be taken off the roads entirely until they can be proven to be road safe. This means CCTV cameras on them, safety barriers, bigger mirrors, bigger windows, whatever it takes. It is down to the manufacturors of HGVs to come up with ideas, test them, and then apply for their ideas to be approved.
  • Existing vehicles must also come off the road and owners must upgrade them. If they cannot be mafde road safe they never go back on the roads.
  • Push for a plan that keeps cyclists safe without being side-tracked into measures that are punitive to business for their own sake.
  • Get all cycling parties to agree on the same subjects
  • segregated cycle lanes like in holland
  • More cycle lanes. All new roads should come with a cycle lane. Cycle bridges to cross over busy junctions.
  • Push Boris Johnson and Andrew Gilligan to follow through on their promises.
  • keep focus on the everyday cyclist - or would-be cyclist - it is all about safety and ease, for people of all ages, without helmets and lycra, who have families and don't want to take any risk at all on safety but who are really keen to cycle if they could (me!)
  • All the above are important, and more funding will be critical to most of them.  I'm a woman aged 54 who has cycled extensively in the Netherlands, France and New Zealand and done loads of cycle touring in the UK, but cycling in London scares the (non-lycra) pants off me.  The one thing that would make me cycle regularly in this wonderful city is a wide network of cycle lanes safely segregated by a curb - not a pointless stripe on the road!  That means fewer parking places, but the benefits to safety, fitness, air quality, traffic flow and all round enjoyment of life would be huge for all ages. 
  • All these things you list are important. I cycle a lot. I don't want to ban cars.I don't want to tell everyone they should ride a bike just because I do. People need more choice they need a good affordable reliable accessible public transport system that way you will reduce congestion ad improve air quality. 
  • Did you know it's cheaper for me to drive my car to Scotland and back than get the train? Is that how sustainable transport should work? I think not.
  • Breathing in toxic traffic pollution is just as much of an issue as the immediate threat of traffic especially as the EU is about to take the UK to court for breaching pollution levels. Safe, separate, cycle paths are the only way to deal with both these issues; the sooner it's done the better.  As long as people have to take the risk of sharing London's road with cars, trucks, and buses, there will only be a small minority who will consider cycling.
  • Keep up pressure to improve HGV safety
  • No parking in cycle lanes.
  • Keep up the pushing! I also think a mandatory 20 speed limit in all built-up urban areas would be seriously helpful.
  • Keep up the campaign for road safety. People are generally selfish in their attitude, and lack consideration to other road users. Cyclists on pavements are dangerous for pedestrians. Car drivers on mobile phones are dangerous, because they lack concentration. HGV drivers are cocooned in their cabs and the safety of other road users depends on their attitude as much as their skill and knowledge. The sense of invulnerability and over-confidence in road users generates accidents through lack of caution, as much as their lack of self-awareness.  
  • Keep campaigning for the abolition of HGVs, at least those w/o safety cameras fitted, and for more spot checks of truck drivers to ensure they have not been driving too long. In the meantime, as a quick win, push for improvements to existing Superhighways, such as soft barriers to stop cars encroaching on them, and some way to stop drivers nosing out into the middle of them at junctions.
  • Press for more funding .... without £ it won't happen
  • I find it hard to make specific recommendations as I am not a London cyclist
  • Ban all hgv not fitted with cycling safety equipment
  • Fully segregated cycle lanes are the only way to really keep cyclists safe. The lanes need to be physically separated from the main road and junctions need to be carefully designed so that cyclists are protected from turning traffic too (not like at the farcical Bow flyover).
  • Banning HGVs in central London.
  • I think that narrowing it down to only one of the items above is a difficult choice!
  • I have chosen Segregated cycle lanes, but am awrare that this would be difficult due to space on lots of roads.
  • I believe training for motorists; lorry drivers and cyclists are all important factors.
  • Because 20mph is a starting point to improve roads for all users including motorists - roads will be safer so more will switch to cycling and walking, so less motor traffic so faster journeys for essential motor users. Less speeding between traffic lights and queues will result in fewer crashes which apart from appalling human costs are also a major cause of congestion.  20mph on almost all urban roads properly enforced will therefore benefit all road users.  Average speeds are only about 1/2 that now... ironically 20mph would probably help with Boris's smoothing traffic flow agenda too, and door to door motor journey times would be cut.  20mph also happens to be the top survivable speed in the event of a crash between motor vehicle and cyclist or pedestrian: around 90% survive; at speeds above 20 fatalities rise sharply. So where people are walking and cycling 20 is the civilised limit if we accept that they should not die when errors are made by themsleves or other road users.  See 20's Plenty website.
  • Get fully integrated wide lanes for cyclists that are blocked off from HGV's and yes, negotiate trucks out of London. To copy the model of Copenhagen or Amsterdam, and then get London to do it better. Even the Thames Path is not totally cycleable now.. 
  • Keep the pressure up and demand something concrete, realistic and achievable. I feel banning HGVs is a really important demand but I think it's a lot harder to achieve. That's why I voted for segregated cycle lanes to be this concrete demand. I feel that this is more likely to get through and won't face too much opposition from the driving lobby (who, frankly, don't want us on "their" roads anyway so this would make everyone happy!). 
  • Keep up the pressure for some form of action to make cycling safer in London.
  • campaign for separate cycle lane everywhere as in other countries.
  • Keep public interest and support; be seen to support training for both HGVs and cyclists
  • Banning HGVs and segregated cycle lanes are the two key issues. We have to redress the imbalance of power on the road.
  • Separate bikes from motor vehicles.
  • Keep cycling...
  • If we have properly segregated cycle lanes - with cyclists barrier or kerb protected from the traffic on the roads - it will undo the need for any of the other proposals. Hence it is the obvious choice to push for. 
  • Keep the pressure on for more details and a planned time table
  • Cycle lanes
  • Concentrating on improving routes through Westminster, which is the weak spot of the new plans.  That requires concentrating on Westminster Council as well as Andrew Gilligan.
  • Get 20mph speed limits enforced
  • Finally, what matters is to normalise the status of cyclists as road users. At present, pedestrians and motor vehicles have clearly defined physical and legal realms. Cyclists occupy an  uncomfortable and dangerous no-man's-land between these two - unwelcome in pedestrian zones and unsafe/ill-considered/disregarded in vehicular zones.
  • Countries where cycling is normalised have high levels of cycle use, high levels of cycle safety and high levels of acceptance in both pedestrian and vehicular realms.
  • I think we need cyclist specific traffic laws, to give cycling and cyclists a clear legal framework.
  • These would include:
  • 1/ a presumption of driver fault in motor vehicle/cyclist accidents (as in Holland)
  • 2/ explicit encouragement for cyclists to behave appropriately on roads (ie left filter at stop/lights, red light equivalent to flashing orange at pedestrian crossings
  • 3/ increased investment in segregated cycle lanes targeted at areas where conflicting requirements between pedestrians/cyclists/motor vehicles is evident/likely.
  • 4/ explicit training for transport engineers in cycling issues
  • 5/ specific requirements for consideration of cycling issues in all transport planning (particularly at road junctions - which are the site of most serious cycling accidents)
  • The problem needs a multi pronged attack:
  • CCTV cameras + Higher standard requirements for HGV drivers where possible
  • Much stiffer penalties for HGV drivers and particularly  their employers.
  • Training for cyclists 
  • stronger requirements for Cyclist visibility wear
  • Segregated lanes for cyclists at intersections and recognised accident hotspots - Not elsewhere -  this leads to driver frustration and more clogging up the roads. The onus should be on getting drivers where they need to be quicker and reducing congestion in this way.
  • segregated lanes,training for bikes,the "Boris bikes"are good but so many are not use the way we drive,since their county`s are on the other side of the road,so many of them  are dumped on estates,helmets are a must!but the riding on pavements?they come up behind one??you just have to hope their not on the steal,many are not ,some are!seen it!but there is no way of traceing them?and the police can not be in all places all the time?i loved riding my bike around London,{I am now a "OAP" and am a danger to my self] GMF
  • Make certain that these are legally binding where any driver who commits crime( For that is what it is) against a cyclist IS severely punished.
  • Bring back the 50cc motors placed inside the back wheel- remember- with the shopping basket and saddle bags. This will help the less physically fit to drop their cars and take up the bike.
  • A ban on HGVs, at rush hour, and perhaps permanently on many streets, would improve air pollution no end, and make cyclists a lot safer
  • Keep cyclists and cars separate wherever possible.
  • Instead  of  banning HGV's,  what  about  NOT allowing  them  during  peak  hours.  That  way  you  have  less  impact  on  business,  but  improve  safety.
  • Campaign to highlight the pitiful amount spent on cycling provision in the UK compared to other European countries: the mayor's & Gilligan's and central & local government plans are just fiddling round the edges and remain in denial about the true scale of commitment required.
  • Raise road awareness for all drivers on the road and make training for cyclists mandatory. 
  • I think you're on the right path to try to formulate priorities and then, with that information, campaign for real change.
  • HGV lorries are more responsible for cycling deaths in cities than anything else. France does not allow these lorries into its cities, yet goods get to peoples doors there. We can do the same. 
  • Get through traffic off minor residential roads. Through-traffic on anything but "A" or "B" main roads needs to become the exception, not the rule. Access-only residential traffic is usually polite towards cyclists - when people are in the first or last couple of hundred metres of their journey, they don't tend to drive so fast.
  • Put in place measures that will reduce/eliminate road deaths. Whether that is more signage for drivers, increasing the number of dedicated cycle lanes or advertising, it needs to be a quick-fix first and then we can worry about policy later.
  • Create segregated cycle lanes away from motor vehicles AND pedestrians. These must be wide enough to allow overtaking in both directions simultaneously and allow for road sweepers to be able to clean from broken glass etc and to allow salt gritting in the winter.
  • Push for training for hgv drivers to be mandatory
  • Disseminate information to motor vehicle drivers on driving safely around cyclists and explain that they do not have priority on the road. Work to highlight the elements of the highway code to them. 
  • Training for cyclists is very important, as are safety provisions on HGVs but I think the focus should be segregated cycle lanes.
  • Stop the situation where someone can be run over without the driver knowing.
  • Funding for segregated cylce lanes
  • Keep campaigning and pushing for safer roads for cyclists.
  • Show examples of cycling countries like Belgiuma and The Netherlands how great it is to have safe cycling roads!
  • Also driver training and equipment on all HGV's with a huge fine if they haven't.
  • Keep the campaign in the public eye - don't let up
  • Push hard for HGV lorries to have the special mirrors as a requirement.
  • Segragated cycle lanes like in Amsterdam - if motorised vehicles and cylces are physically separated it would be much safer to cycle in London. It is a real shame that cycling here means 100% energetic concentration on not getting run over or knocked off bike when in central London. Cycling is physically easy, quick and clean. It should be easy to do as well, but sharing space with lethal vehicles is not the solution.
  • Working hours ban on HGVs similar to other capital cities (e.g Paris) would be great
  • push for more street CCTV camera's so all vehicles are monitored and provide signage notifying drivers. Include infra red camera's also. 
  • To make sure that cycling is key to urban regernation and economic prosperity - don't just asphalt the routes, make them green too and change planning laws along segregated cycle lanes to encourage street furniture, playparks and small scale retail. 
  • Get cycle lanes that separate cycles and other vehicles on all main roads.
  • 20mph speed limit
  • Protect the existing cycle lanes with kerbs or concrete blocks so that cars cannot use them as extra lanes when the car in front is turning right.  This usage of the 'superhighway' is terrifying.
  • Campaign for positive change - cycle lanes, both segregated and otherwise
  • I don't think segregated cycle lanes are a good idea - I think cyclists should be part of normal traffic. As the number of cyclists using the roads increases, cycling becomes normallised and cyclists get safer. I think 20mph speed limits - IF ENFORCED - are a good idea. I think large vehicles are the biggest problem, and effective safety features and training should be mandatory.
  • Segregated cycle lanes and also stiff penalties for drivers who should not be at the wheel - ie banning them from driving. I understand a lot of HGV drivers had been driving longer than they were allowed when a number were stopped. Getting those drivers off the road will make things safer. I think bans for those who use their mobiles, play on their computers or drink hot drinks whilst at the wheel would also be a good idea. 
  • Improve safety by investing in cycle lanes and cycling safety training for cyclists and motorists. For example, quick-wins, how can we give easy and affordable access to high visibility jackets. As a motorist I see so many cyclists that are not visible enough on our roads, and as a cyclist find many don't understand cyclists giving them inadaquate space
  • I think that overall motorists are more respectful to cyclists than they were 30 years ago. I'm a regular cyclist commuter and sometimes have the odd argument with bad motorists but my pet hate is that 'some cyclists think they 'we' have the given right and everything is somebody elses fault ie the motorists. I believe that there should be training for cyclists, as i did back in the day with a cyclist proficiency test before you are allowed to cycle on the road. What ever happened to these? Do they still exist? Not only that, but surely in the driving test there should be more consideration given to how car/lorry drivers deal with cyclists on a day to day basis.
  • get the government to deliver on their promises ie actually do something to help cycling instead of just saying they will
  • This campaign is probably best as an outrider for more mainstream groups like the LCC. That means going further, asking tougher questions and demanding more - but crucially on the same threads/strands.
  • Therefore it should focus on the "space for cycling" strand - the separation in time or space of cycles for motor traffic. This may be through closing through routes to traffic or high quality physicial separation on much more of the capital's road. 
  • There is no value in a group like this focussing on specific pieces of infrastrucure like the CS2 (bad as it is) unless it is to illustrate a wider point - these issues are best addressed locally and SOC has a much broader, city(and nation)wide scope.
  • Look at how they do it in Munster, Germany.
  • Promote discussions of radical plans for a major development of cycling
  • To lobby that all HGV to have special sensors to alert drivers, if the cyclist is in a blind spot
  • I think we should focus on the achievable. There has been a lot of press about pollution from HGVs causing health problems in cities and how banning them or at least restricting them can really benefit the health of a city. I think banning/ restricting HGVs would be great for cyclists and would also have universal appeal outside of the cycling community. This would have the advantage of helping get support from other areas, making it more likely to be successful!
  • I'll be honest. I am not a cyclist - too old at 78 to ride except on quite country lanes - but I support cyclists even though many ride on pavements down my street. However, I don't trust the Mayor's office, and feel that you need more details. Clear ones. No hedging. I'll support you whatever. As Ed Murrow used to say: "Goodnight and good luck."
  • Police enforcement against motor traffic offences, including a commitment to pursue maximum penalties for those caught on camera by victims and/or witnesses.  Video evidence is highly compelling, far more so than witness statements or even still photographs.  Yet it is barely used.
  • This includes, but is not limited to, close overtakes, pointless overtakes (the old "must get in front" even when it's directly into the back of another queue), left hooks, right crosses, traffic light violations (including ASL infringements), cycle and bus lane infringements, and SMIDSYs.
  • When caught on ANY camera, there is compelling evidence of the offence, and failing to act on that evidence is tantamount to being complicit in it's commission.
  • Deliberately aggressive driving around vulnerable road users needs to be treated (always) as dangerous driving.  There is no excuse, ever.  It is using a motor vehicle as a weapon, and needs to be treated as such.
  • Far more use could be made of police powers under s59 of the Police Reform Act - it only needs for a constable to "have reason to believe" that it was careless or inconsiderate, and caused alarm, distress or annoyance, and that is a very easy standard of proof to meet.
  • Push for HGV restrictions.
  • As a former HGV driver, the biggest single difference that could be quickly implemented would be a requirement that all HGVs entering the M25 cordon be double manned, with BOTH crew qualified HGV drivers, both with cycling experience and at least one (later, both) trained to level 3 BikeAbility.  If you can't use a bicycle responsibly, you have no business driving a heavy goods vehicle among cyclists!  Likewise for bus and coach drivers.
  • Then heavy restrictions on High-cab HGVs, which are now unfit for use in heavy traffic (the old models, with the driver further forward, were far better).
  • Make cyclists aware of blind spots around vehicles and how they can keep themselves safe. I see people doing stupid things every day on the streets, not just the obvious one if jumping lights. 
  • what you are doing - keep the pressure on.... and raise awareness of how cyclists are scapegoated - by drivers and pedestrians alike. readily abused by both. Get people thinking and talking about why exactly that is. easy scapegoats for the inconvenience other people feel in general about traffic and road crossing etc. etc.
  • Pursue Andrew Gilligan's idea to decriminalise cars in the bike box and make this a fine-able offence by TFL instead.  TFL should implement CCTV around bike boxes/ASLs and aggressively fine motorists in the box/cycle lanes as they do for bus lanes.  I think this would have a ripple effect on motorists being more cautious and respectful of cyclists, and money made from fines could be pumped into building more cycle infrastructure.
  • Push on for segregated cycle lanes as well as training for cyclists. A lot of time cyclists do not cyle properly, making it awkward for drivers to avoid them. 
  • more awareness campaigns aimed to occasional riders
  • ban HGVs during rush hours
  • Campaigning for proactive action on potholes and loose surfacing, alongside an expanded cycling programme (potholes can be the least visible and hardest avoided risk).
  • Get schools,families, medical and educational involvement. Safe cycling FOR ALL which includes 11 year olds cycling to school. When London is safe to cycle for children then we will have accomplished a workable safer cycling infrastructure.  While the car is king children die on our roads everyday as pedestrians, along with too many adult cyclists. We need to link up with sustrans family initiatives for real alternatives to the car.  Go Dutch.
  • Get binding commitments from government
  • Cycle lanes separated from vehicular traffic by hefty kerbstones so that traffic CANNOT stray into them.  Cyclists would both feel and BE safer and this would in turn make it safer for pedestrians and cut down crazy cyclist self preservation behaviour to practically nothing.  At the moment cyclists R loathed by both pedestrians and traffic.  No other measure above would be as effective as this and U will be blown away by how cycling rather than driving would quadruple 10 times over.  At the moment it's pretty much the young only who have the nerve 2 cycle in London.  It would be fantastic if old people rediscovered their bikes.
  • Take out adds in the paper. Use photos and stories of people involved. 
  • Contact those who have been injured in road traffic accidents  or contact the families of loved ones who have died. Ask them to share their stories. Set up a Kick Starter campaign, to keep this highlighted. Segregated cycle lanes, 20 MPH speed limits will all help . Banning of HGV's but it all costs money and we need to embarrass the government who are happy to keep members of the armed forces and tanks in Germany, yet we can't keep people safe at home. Bring the army back from Germany. Fund more cycle lanes.
  • Keep sweet talking Andrew Gilligan, and keep the pressure on Boris
  • https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/strict-liability-law-for-motorists
  • build a stronger activist base to campaign for cycling safety
  • 1) Push for 20mph limits and good enforcement - good cost/benefit ratio, costs little, some boroughs have already done it, so clearly easy to do.
  • 2) segregated cycle paths to double for major through routes - but not aim for them everywhere, because that could mean effectively turning neighbouring local roads into car rat-runs, to the detriment of those who live on them or have to get there. 
  • 3) Ban HGVs in central London - but it will never work, given all the major construction projects. 
  • London and the UK needs to re-prioritise road use in terms of physical vulnerability and least damage done to the environment. Walkers should be prioritised over cyclists, who should be prioritised over any motor vehicle, should be followed by motorcyclists, then buses, then motorcars, then vans, then HGVs etc. At hte moment might equals right so a change in the law for strict liability would
  • Councils should also be able to fine motorists heavily by using CCTV for entering an ASL whilst the light is red  - ALL revenue generated MUST be poured back into cycling particularly building further segregated cycling facilities and resurfacing existing cycle facilities; and any unused budget must be either rolled forward to the next year for cycling use. 
  • Get HGVs banned.
  • Push for cycle lanes seperate from roads like they have in Holland.
  • Keep up the pressure, there was a real response and concern in the wake of so many cycle deaths, don't let Boris and Gilligan off the hook!
  • Keep the pressure up, but let's not conflict with the excellent #spaceforcycling LCC campaign - can we combine our efforts rather than reinventing the wheel (pun intended!)
  • Keep the momentum going! 
  • protests at every town hall at each of the London Boroughs
  • I'm not a London cyclist but my daughter is.  I think one of her major concerns is the HGVs hurtling around.  In an ideal world it would be good to ban them from London roads altogether but that is probably impractical so I think making them safe is the priority - safety features on the trucks themselves and training for the drivers.  Of course segregated cycle lanes and 20mph would be brilliant too!
  • proper cycle lanes- most are next to useless, many are too narrow, stop all of a sudden- shared with pedestrians, or motorbikes, cars either drive in them or park in them- total rubbish
  •  and so I dont use them and feel safer cycling in bus  lanes but then Im a very confident cyclist- many people arent and SO DIE
  • Keep the issue in public awareness - that in itself reminds drivers that we are here! Beyond that I think both improving HGV/cyclist visibility is paramount, but also buses, vans and cars - I have had more problems with everything apart from HGV's. This is in part du to the fact I am scared of them and keep well away but it is certain drivrs that ar the problem. Therefore surely segregated cycle lanes would really help. Obviously education for cyclists & drivers re. safety etc.
  • Making sure that ALL road users are trained and encouraged to be aware of each other, whether it be for HGV drivers to be aware of those on two wheels (or two legs), for cyclists to behave appropriately at junctions and crossings considering pedestrians, and for pedestrians to think about the traffic whether on two wheels, four wheels or more and not on their mobile devices.
  • Demand an update on Q1 progress on Gilligan's plan/vision 
  • Get as much media attention as possible. Hold more demos.  Get pedestrians involved.
  • Push for segregated Dutch-style lanes and closing back roads as through routes for motor traffic. Also, push for faster progress from TFL; their current rate is glacial. 
  • Ban all lorries from london untill 2200, and up to 0600
  • I want to see the push extended to other big UK cities like Manchester etc
  • Controls of HGVs are clearly important too but protected tracks is clearly number 1.
  • Put forward a plan to use the very many broad and empty pavements to cycle on. For example on one side of the road the pavement could be for cyclists, on the other for pedestrians. We have a ludicrous situation of empty pavements on many roads and overcrowded and dangerous roads.
  • Some roads in Central London should only be used for bicycles, with no other vehicles allowed. The speed limit in Central London and in residential areas should be reduced to 20mph. This would make me feel safer as a pedestrian.
  • In addition, there should be roads dedicated to bicycles all around London. Any cycle lanes should be raised like the pavement, and preferably not next to a main road. It is not healthy for cyclists to breathe in traffic fumes. The raised cycle lanes should be next to relatively quiet roads with a speed limit of 20mph for the cars.
  • We need to make London as safe for cyclists and pedestrians as it presently is for motorists.
  • We should ban very large lorries and coaches from central London and dramatically reduce parking spaces for motor vehicles.
  • We also need to focus on enforcement of traffic laws and the negative/aggressive attitude toward ALL vulnerable road users. Focus also needs to be given to the antisocial practices of car drivers,  like pavement parking, using cycle lanes as additional parking, and parking up with hazard lights on when not broken down. Proper direct cycle lanes would be great, but abuse of these facilities and impatience towards vulnerable road users will continue until attitudes are changed,  but it now needs to be with a stick, the government and police has allowed the existing environment to go on for too long and will only worsen as more traffic inevitably ends up on the road.
  • Tighten up on road discipline for everybody on the roads.
  • Many more 20mph speed limits.
  • Use bollards to block rat runs for through motor traffic. 
  • Get specifics, see if they're adequate. Contribute the data you will have pooled from this survey to help Gilligan plan his policy.
  • Encourage the executive / the met to prioritise the laws that keep people safe.
  • This doesn't mean ignoring all cyclists who break the law, but it does mean focusing more on drivers who break the speed limit, for example, because that puts lives at risk.
  • It doesn't need a change in the law, or investment in new infrastructure, just a change in mindset to one focused on keeping people as safe as possible.
  • Separate roads for cyclists, more cars and heavy goods vehicles need to be removed from our roads because of global warming.
  • Try to bring our road laws on accidents between motorists and cyclists in line with those in the EU.
  • Maybe getting Brussels to help bring this in throughout the EU would do the trick.
  • I think if I've understood it that left turning lorries killing female cyclists is the most serious issue to be addressed and that can be helped by banning HGVs from central London during certain hours,but also by CCTV and Safety Provisions and also with some education of cyclists.
  • Would HGVs still be coming in during nighttime ? If so then CCTV & Education remain high priority.Its not one issue but a package.
  • Keep up the pressure exactly as you are doing.  [Great job, by the ,way].  
  • My view is not as helpful as I'd hope because I no longer cycle in and out of Central London, though I would if I still worked there.  London grew organically over centuries and wasn't designed, so it's going to be hard to make it completely safe for cyclists.  Narrow streets in central London shouldn't be open to cars at all, and perhaps only to HGVs outside rush hour.  Motorcycles, OK, but 20 mph.  Speed limits are crucial - probably single most crucial factor. 
  • I think top priorities should be:
  • 1-To ask for free compulsory training for cyclists and HGV drivers. I had wo hours with Islington council service and found it really useful. In past sometimes I did not know where was safest to position myself on the road. I think anyone cycling should have some training, specially if they don't drive like is my case. I see many cars being aggresive and not respecting cyclist but also see cyclist doing so and it is a bit like a jungle...encouragement of mutual respect has to come from education and awareness programs publicly funded. Yes cyclist ahve to demand more safety, but also to comit to respect the common rules otherwise we loose our legitimate voice.
  • 2-To ask for lanes exclusive to cyclists.
  • Co-ordinate this campaign with other cycling groups (LCC, CTC, British Cycling etc). One loud coherent voice will have a much bigger impact and chance of success than many small voice asking for competing priorities.
  • It's general training for all road users. London cabbies are some of the worst drivers on the road so along with learning The Knowledge, they need to have some respect for cyclists drilled into them.
  • Enforcement of existing traffic regulations and a serious crackdown on dangerous driving, especially by HGV drivers, would go a very long way. And super-cheaply!
  • This is really simple. Nobody would suggest that it can be safe for pedestrians to walk in the road. A cyclist is not really any safer than a pedestrian walking in the road so the solution is to segregate cyclists from other traffic. By the same token it would be inappropriate for cyclists to use the footway, as this would compromise the safety of cyclists and pedestrians.
  • We need to rethink road use such that not every road may be used by vehicles (residential parking excepted) and we then develop proper signage and road markings such that cyclists have dedicated road which have well signposted routes taking them out of harms way (including the harm from exhaust fumes). Where vehicles may use designated cycle roads then the speed limit for such vehicles would be 20mph. 
  • I'm a driver as well as a cyclist and I don't believe that each is a warring faction. Sadly and as usual,narrow minded politicians have a long history of creating arbitrary "sides" and playing one off against the other. I call "Benefits" as my first witness.
  • This is a problem that can be solved simply by the use of applied intelligence. If only our politicians had some.
  • Proper cycle lanes!!
  • one of the most dangerous aspects of tfl Boris is the cycle lanes. there for a few metres then disappear.
  • Training for HGV drivers would be a good interim step.
  • Demonstrate how best practices. ( the Dutch model) can bring about positive change for the city.
  • require commitment to nivestment in redesigning roads
  • We need to push for more SAFER cycle lanes. HGVs should be banned during the day, a speed limit would help pedestrians and cyclists alike.
  • The thing that always strikes me about cycling in London is the poor quality of the road surface. Potholes are a problem at this time of the year anyway, but poorly repaired roads after maintenance make cycling dangerous, forcing cyclists to maneouvre around manhole covers in recesses and uneven road surfaces in bus lanes in a way that even the most diligent driver would find it difficult to predict. My tip would be to cycle from Old Street roundabout to Theobald's Road via Farringdon and Clerkenwell Road, and any politician or planner will see that that needs addressing post-haste! 
  • Improving the existing road infrastructure would be a fruitful enterprise anyway, and would give planners an opportunity to implement larger changes while they're at it. 
  • Planners need to start reassigning carriageway space to cyclists - especially at pinch points. A binding infrastructure design code for all new road facilities in London. 
  • Take the blame away from cyclists by training HGV drivers to drive better.  Cycling network needs to be assessed by a cyclist.
  • My experience of cycling in London is that there is a definite them and us attitude, where drivers get irritated by cyclists especially at traffic lights when everyone is raring to accelerate.  If cyclists were given the time to clear the junction and position themselves in the right lane then this would partially alleviate the problem.  
  • The network needs to be more integrated, even areas where you would expect there to be good cycling provision for instance in Central London parks is often badly thought out.  
  • Glaringly obvious problem areas are when pedestrians and cyclists share routes - no one has any idea where they are supposed to be.  Clear delineation is necessary.  Obvious coloured paths like superhighway is needed.
  • I think all cycle advocate groups should be concentrating on an enforced London wide 20 mph speed limit with no exemptions for TfL Red Routes.
  • This is the single most important factor in reducing death and serious injury, plus it has the benefit of minimal cost to the Government, giving them no excuse not to implement.
  • A ban on all HGV's and LGV's over 3.5 tonnes least during rush hour periods.
  • Start designing a long term plan to make proper cycle way provision in London. Separate routes so we are not sharing roads or pavements. 
  • Segregated cycle lanes will take some time I believe, so quick fixes like 20mph speed limits would help.
  • Hold Motorists to account for their actions on the road. Pressure the police and authorities (CPS) to 
  • begin high profile cases against drivers who injure and kill cyclists.
  • Do not allow paltry fines to be the worst news a motorist can expect for their careless/ dangerous driving.
  • CCTv at junctions to catch Cyclists and Motorist who jump red lights. Maybe even begin and support a campaign to license cyclists so that when stopped for dangerous actions on the roads they too can be properly held accountable. 
  • I dont know how workable any of this is but my non cycling friends constantly quote no repercussions for cyclists who ride badly and disregard the traffic lights as their biggest bug bear.
  • Myself I think they just hate waiting in traffic and are jealous of cyclists "getting on" quicker than them.
  • get this built:
  • http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/jan/02/norman-foster-skycycle-elevated-bike-routes-london
  • Ban hgv's in town
  • Banning HGVs in central London
  • Educate drivers and cyclists.
  • Because of the number of accidents
  • As vulnerable road users it is in cyclist's interest that everyone obey the rules, so we should lead by example; never intervening in pedestrian road space. And look over your shoulder before pulling out to overtake a bus, yes you MAMILs! Then we can insist upon changes in the rules that favour and prioritise cycle safety.
  • Promote cycling in the nation
  • I think the aim should be to restrict HGV's and try to make london more like Amsterdam where cycling is considered the best way to travel around the city. Segregated cycle paths are good. I have 3 kids who have to use the pavements as the rroads are to dangerous for them. Well done for all your hard work...keep it up
  • lobby for cleaner air and banning of diesel vehicles within two years
  • Cyclists need to have more rights on Britain's, especially London's, streets. This has to start when drivers get their training: they have to learn that cyclists are part of the street and have the same rights and need consideration.
  • Agitate so that all of us cyclists are taking responsibility to obey the highway code and road laws. Too many of us (in London) ignore, flout road safety and heighten prejudice and resentment to us all. Cyclists also frequently put one another in danger. We are no above the law - so for other road users to show us respect and help keep both us and themselves safe - we ned a campaign for self awareness and responsibility.
  • Get the message out about all the benefits that cycling brings to the city.
  • Engage the group through social media/blog and build momentum; need to move from 1 way comms to 2 way communication
  • All of the above are important but the only real way to protect cyclists and a true long term solution is segregated lanes. 
  • I would like to see both a ban on HGV's and also Segregated cycle lanes, there are,there are so many things that need to be done most if not all of the above, I understand that we can't have everything, but maybe be could get an action plan together with dates of when actions need to be completed, the list will always get longer.
  • Make sure existing legislation is enforced. I am a cyclist and I see more and more drivers on their phones - calling or TEXTING - whilst driving, which is a real danger to cyclists. WHERE IS THE TRAFFIC POLICE ??? (vanished due to cuts, like flood defences?)
  • Focus one key message: space for safe cycling. That way we encourage more people to cycle and come closer to reaching a critical mass of cyclists on the road. 
  • Ensuring High Quality dedicated infrastructure. 
  • Despite lipservice, the Mayor seems to be intent on moving away from subsidised public transport and promoting pedestrian and cycling activity. Painting existing roadways is not an approach that can deliver safe cycling routes. Cycling and walking promote health and, along with public transport, decrease congestion and pollution. We need a strong, positive policy which invests in appropriate modern infrastructure and transport. The taxpayer will reap the rewards of a healthier population in the long run. The mayor shouldn't shy away from investing in the people of London.  
  • Keep making our voices heard.
  • Keep the issue of cycling in the public eye. But not by focusing on deaths, which just scares people. Instead focus on, say, the right to cycle and do so safely; health and environmental benefits.
  • Cycling should be considered in any planning/transport decision
  • Invest in better cycling infrastructure throughout London; based on the best of european design standards - providing full segregation wherever possible; and prioritising transport planning away from maximising traffic flow towards making more liveable cities.
  • Pushing for cycle lanes being drawn on the pavement where ever possible, For cyclist to go in both directions on either side of the road. This does not cost much and could be done very quickly. It is common practice to do this in Germany. Pedestrians will quickly get used to it. Additionally any new road contractions must make cycle ways where ever possible and off the roads. 
  • I've stopped cycling at the moment because my fears of the HGVs on the roads during peak times - when I cycle down the segregated cycle lanes the difference is remarkable, I actually feel able to relax and enjoy the cycling. 
  • Also train HGV drivers.
  • Are you concerned about  the massive increase in Lorries due to HS2 train line works in London?
  • We need an education campaign to make drivers understand that we are human beings on the road with exactly same rights and not insects to crush I'm tired of the constant abuse I get every single day. 
  • Contact MPs and get them to demand a Commons vote
  • Education for everyone
  • Driver killed a 9 year old boy in Wales, no licence, no insurance and then drove off leaving his victim to fate.  Sentenced to 22 months, served 10.  His licence will be returned to him...bit like letting a pedophile back into school on the promise that next time things will probably be alright. If ministers let that happen they'd have a riot on their hands and heads would roll at the sheer recklessness of that decision but with motoring no problem.
  • Try going out in the street and shooting someone and leaving them to die and persuade the court it was just an 'accident'.  With a car it's acceptable...why?
  • There needs to be a mix, but improving the lanes so that they are not level with or accessible to cars/hgvs.
  • HGVs should be used at night.  There is not need for such massive vehicles on our roads in the daytime.
  • Also this should not just be for London but the whole of the UK.  Gilligan should be pushed for more.  Separate cycle lanes would be a far better idea than the line down the road we currently have as most drivers ignore them and ASLs 
  • Protect the NHS and benefit claimants.
  • To keep awareness in the minds of all road users that cyclists can be in a very vulnerable position on the roads. I think they are often seen as a irritation and until attitudes change I fear that cyclists will be involved in many more unnecessary accidents. Social attitudes will change if we manage to keep the issue in the media.
  • All the issues that you highlight are worthy and I think educational for drivers, improved infrastructure and funding for these to happen are as vital as a proper cycle lane system in and around London.   
  • look it seems we can only vote for 1 thing but we need; training for cyclists, 20 miles per hour speed limits and segregated cycles lanes where possible
  • Speed change. The thing that will do that is money. 
  • Driver education has to be the number 1 priority.  Most drivers are ok but the message has to get through to all.  The Met's Roadsafe team do a good job of sending warnings to many drivers reported to them, however the penalties for the most dangerous are far too lenient.  Drivers would be better informed on how to drive with cyclists if they were trained from the outset.  If people knew the consequences for dangerous acts would have a greater impact on their lives they would learn not to commit dangerous acts.  A final point is the strict liability law in cases where accidents do happen.  If those injured were able to access funds more swiftly this would be of benefit to them; and may also help educate those in charge of dangerous machinery that they must take proper care on the roads.
  • Work to discourage aggressive driving.  Marketing cars as "thrilling", showing video of car chases and so on should be stopped.  Most vehicles that hit cyclists (and others) are driven by young men, so stop them driving, or at least give them serious self-awareness training and provisional licences.
  • Make single occupancy vehicle journeys pariahs. 
  • Make sure safety standards on HGVs are improved and enforced, cyclist training may help but I don't believe it will be effective enough or reach enough people.
  • start highlighting how easy it would be to get cycle lanes. Eg if we reduce Euston road from 6 lanes to 4 or 5, it would give space for a cycle lane from Kings Cross to Regent's Park.
  • I don't think lesson for driver works well! Once they pass exam that is all! If there isn't real law enforcement cars will still run on cyclist road. People who blaming cyclist missing this important point! When cars keep run on cyclist road cyclist pushed out to risky root or pavement! 
  • The entire road system in London ought to be looked at again. Cyclists should be able to point out on a website where they think the most dangerous junctions are, and the police should be watching those junctions, and picking up drivers who misbehave, not just catching cyclists who go through red-lights. HGVs should NOT be allowed on London roads if they cannot see cyclists. It's all very well telling cyclists not to go up inside lorries at traffic lights, but the lorries come up alongside cyclists and then turn in front of them - what can a cyclist do? Also some bus drivers behave abominably to cyclists - that should be being monitored with cameras ON THE BUSES.
  • Pedestrians have a bad time too. How many traffic lights make pedestrians wait twice, whereas road traffic has only to wait once? 
  • Active enforcement - the police must enforce ASLs, and keep checking HGVs until they don't find a huge proportion breaking safety regulations. Together with more publicity around driver behaviour, this could be implemented today - unlike an HGV ban, or vital infrastructure improvements.
  • Press the Mayor to look into the problems associated with HGV's in Central London and seek a strategic solution that benefits all parties & stakeholders involved. 
  • No point in banging heads against the wall we need a pragmatic workablesution that maximises health & safety for cyclists in London.
  • Make Cyclists visible.Every bike rider should wear a high visibility jacket.
  • Cycling news should be 60 seconds of safe cycling
  • Restrict through traffic on all residential streets - based on the 'Groningen' approach - ie map out all residential areas, allowing a peripheral outer route for vehicles - allowing access to the 'cell' only to residential and service vehicles. 
  • Simple, effective, cheap. Use bollards, planters - even on a trial basis to start - complaints from motorists etc usually die down after an initial reaction. Through traffic is eliminated by ensuring there are no routes accessible across the 'cell'. This has already strated to work fantastically well in Hackney and elsewhere, but needs to be pushed as a London-wide (and nationwide) policy. In addition, other problematic minor and major roads that have deterrant effects on cycling should also be considered for restricted motor vehicle access (again making some allowances for residents and emergency services along with others where deemed necessary).  
  • Simply keep the pressure on. 
  • Fines for endangering cyclists 
  • Push TfL to create protected (segregated) cycle lanes on the roads it controls. The Quietways are just a way of pushing responsibility for failure on to the boroughs. 
  • More road space for cyclists. Real priority for cyclists at junctions. High profile Zero tolerance approach to policing all the rules of the road.
  • Some areas have wide pavements . Paint cycle lanes on these and you have a ready made kerb as a barrier between cyclists and cars. As long as there is space left for 2 pedestrians to pass each other. I would rather have this than the risks of danger to cyclists, while we wait for decisions on whether to spend money on creating barriers.
  • My son cycles to work in London daily.
  • Push for infrastructure. Training means nothing, especially without enforcement. Gilligan's response is just a lot of fine words. I won't believe anything has changed until I see decent new infrastructure. I want to be able to cycle with my family, not have to ride like a road warrior.
  • We need to segregate motor traffic from cycle traffic as this is the number one issue that people cite when asked whether they cycle in London. Separate cycle lanes that exist such as the one in Royal College street, Camden, are fantastic. Please give more road space over to cycling, as they have done in Amsterdam or Copenhagen, where you see much higher numbers of cycle journeys made. 
  • Press Gilligan for SMART targets in terms of his vision and its implementation.
  • Try to defuse some of the driver/cyclist animosity. As much of. A problem with some cyclists as with some drivers. How about a stop @ red campaign (jerseys etc) to highlight we are not all unaware of the rules of the road
  • We need to be more like Holiday and have better cycle lanes traffic lights etc. 
  • HGVs are simply not appropriate in Central London - they damage roads and buildings as well as offering a deadly threat to cyclists. I doubt many HGVs need to be in Central London anyway, so a ban should not be an inconvenience. As a first step a survey should be carried out to establish the numbers of HGVs using Central London's roads, and to identify alternative routes.
  • The most important thing to do now is to demand for safe cycle lanes, where there is no danger from motorised vehicles. A lot of people are not able to weave in and out between cars and vans, dodging traffic and even with the skills would not want to ride in this way.
  • I love riding my bike however I have stopped and  have discouraged my children from riding theirs as it is not safe on the roads. In Paris their are cycle lanes with little walls, no risk of being knocked off.
  • Determination of funding for safer cycling for London Boroughs who vary in their financial ability to support improvements. This will need GLA support.
  • Long term commitment to redesigning London's roads so they are safer for all users pedestrians, cyclists, motorists. The closest parallels are the redesign of Paris's roads since the 1995 air pollution Act and of course road design in Denmark and The Netherlands, as well as Germany. This should be linked to other issues such as provision of roadside tree planting (to absorb particulates and provide shade in hot periods and provide biodiversity).
  • Dutch / Danish design of all new road projects
  • Push for more funding for safe cycling so that more cyclists take to the roads of london - more cyclists means safety in numbers - segregated lanes are the way forward.
  • Separate cycle lanes & restricted traffic back roads are essential to keeping cyclists safe & encouraging more people of all walks of life onto 2 wheels.
  • All of the issues above are important in some way, but the most important thing to do is make everyone share the road. And this means also making more of a share for cyclists. We need segregated lanes, and if that means more money for the Cycling Vision, then these two go hand in hand. We need a concerted effort to not have motorists hate cyclists, either so the sharing idea is crucial. A lot of 'unconscious' damage can be done if there is anger and resentment from motorists.
  • Campaign for a high profile, segregated lane to be put in this summer - to show what can be done, how it works and how it can be done quickly.  In other countries, they are installed quickly eg New York - here, even the Grid will take 2-3 years.
  • HGVs are the most frightening aspect of cycling in London and new and inexperienced cyclists would feel more secure if their use was restricted during peak times such as rush hour.  Training should be part of the  package.
  • Keep the pressure up as we've got some momentum now
  • Campaign for something that we can breathe that doesn't kill us. They seem to monitor air quality without publicising results that show it's barely legal and doing something about it. 
  • I think taking HGVs off the roads in London during the morning and evening rush hour would be great. There should also be a better training of HGV drivers and bus drivers on cyclist. I also think there needs to be work done to stop the animosity between cyclists and motorists as I think this leads to a downwards spirel where cyclist and motorist do increasingly inconsidered things to one another. Ultimately, I motorist should get 3 points on there licence if they clip a cyclist/pedestrian, injury or death should result in a ban unless it can clearly be shown the cyclist or pedestrian is reckless. 
  • Most of this is still only minor change. We need a sea change that will be:
  •    better for people's health
  •    better for pollution
  •    keep cyclists safe and make them most prioritised road users (most efficient)
  •    help with climate change
  • pushing for dedicated cycling space with adequate separations and lane protection
  • Many younger cyclists are dangerous on the road and on pavements. We need all cyclists to be accountable and it seems essential to me that all cycles have working front and back lights which they have to use from dusk and working bell plus to abide by all traffic and road safety measures. I have nearly been flattened by a bike (yanked to safety) on the pavement. As a cyclist it is dangerous being on the same road with impatient commuting cyclists of whom there are many in london. Cyclists need to give respect and time for pedestrians crossing and to cars who cannot always see them ovettaking on the indide and then cutting right in front of them which is unlawful. People on foot are not safe with cycles on pavements so please do not as for shared spaces. Also it is unsafe for cyclists lungs to share traffic-filled streets. There needs to be a creative solution - but please do not remove our lovely pedestrisn walkways to do so. There is little left for the human to roam not on some form of transport. Create a virtuous circle.
  • Keep pushing on the speedy design and implementation of segregation - it is the only solution.
  • Segregated cycles lanes can't happen overnight. Filtered permeability and 20mph can. The quietways can't also be rat-runs, and some of the proposed routes are still unsafe if drivers are overtaking aggressively and pushing us into the door zone. So simple cheap blockades - trees in planters, bike racks etc. - could be installed overnight to close off the ends of rat-runs. Crowdsource suggestions from cyclists, create local groups (inc. pedestrian groups, parents, elderly etc) and use Localism to put pressure on local authorities to make it happen quickly.
  • Concerted, peaceful, continuation of this excellent campaign.  I have picked HGVs as main issue but I don't know how realistic that is - construction is construction, although parts of my ride to work are basically all crossrail sites :( I want to see the police enforce the rules of the road a bit more and not just against cyclists!  Fight for your right to cyyyyycle.
  • Make sure all cycle lanes are segregated starting as soon as possible
  • There needs to be more investment on real bike lanes like those in Holland & Denmark
  • away from traffic
  • CCTV cameras and safety provisions on HGVs and banning them form central London apart from early morning and late at night
  • we need to have some sort of personal recognition for individual cyclists to be identifiable,so that those who  flout the law, and those that have no consideration for anyone else, and those cyclists who have cycle rage are bought to account. There are too many cyclists riding on pedestrian crossings, pavements not designated as cycle lanes,up one way streets the wrong way and riding dangerously and riding at night without lights.These individuals have given the impression to the general public that all cyclists are morons.We have to prove that the majority of cyclists are not morons but law abiding considerate people.
  • push the mayor to deliver sooner rather than later
  • There are many people who do not take road safety seriously.  I see no end of mindless aggression, arrogance, thoughtlessness, impatience, and obsession with speed.  Their attitudes are the biggest problem.  I believe it can be solved by stringent enforcement by police of existing road safety legislation, and that this should apply to all types of road user: motorists, cyclists, pedestrians, whatever.
  • I used to work in a factory (actually an aircraft hangar) where we were subject to many potential hazards eg toxic or corrosive chemicals (sometimes at extreme temperatures), noise, vibration, heavy machinery,...  However, the firm took safety seriously, and this included employing a health & safety officer whose duties included instilling a sense of safety awareness in the workforce.  Everyone there took safety seriously and worked to established procedures.  As a result, you were able to feel perfectly safe working there, and you really only had to worry about surviving the journey to and from work.
  • I know from this experience that the situation on the roads doesn't need to be the way it currently is.  The problem could be solved if only the police would concentrate on this, rather than harassing & beating up peaceful protestors, striking miners, etc; persecuting people for being Irish, black or gay; or killing people for selling newspapers near a G20 protest, or for looking Brazilian.  I therefore suggest pressing for revised police priorities.
  • Focus on the appalling behaviour of some cyclists who give us all a bad name, e.g. riding on the pavements (often at speed) & believing it to be legal; charging through red lights scattering pedestrians legally trying to cross their path; swearing & gesticulating offensively at anyone who gets in their way or who tries to challenge them. 
  • If I want to get from point to point in London, the only way to do it is via the road and without going a very round-about route, a main road. Most people would be comfortable cycling on residential streets: it's the main arteries that it are scary. What I believe we need to do is to make these roads feel less scary, less like no-cycling-zones. I am sure we can do this most quickly by changing driving behaviour on these roads. We want drivers to feel that they are a guest in central London not as if they are driving on a bypass. 20 mile-an-hour speed limits across the board in the congestion charge zone would be an incredibly powerful first step. This could be accompanied by psychological design moves such as removing pedestrian barriers, applying rumble strips and speed control measures that slow traffic down at junctions where collisions are most likely.
  • Take for example Finchley Road, a major route into town for me, the alternative is the round-about and hilly route through Hampstead. The speed limit is 30 miles per hour but when traffic isn't too heavy drivers are comfortable breaking this limit: it feels like a 40 mile-an-hour road. If a 20 mile per hour limit were set it should keep actual maximum speeds down to more like 25. A 20 mile-an-hour speed limit across the congestion charge zone would be clear to explain, not involve major roadworks and would radically change the experience of cyclists and pedistrians in the whole of central London.
  • Demand specifics from politicians - it's very easy for them to 'greenwash' their policies by marketing themselves as being very cycle-friendly (e.g. "X million pounds of investment in cycling"), without delivering, or delivering in ways which don't serve the needs of most cyclists OVER MOTORISTS.
  • Quickly respond to proposals in a simple 'what we like', 'what we don't like' format, and generate mainstream and social media interest.
  • Monitor implementation of plans.
  • Keep the pressure on Gilligan. 
  • Build on ties with more radical campaigns and get involved with more direct action.
  • Keep the issue on the news and pressure up
  • Create an environment wherein every policy maker's current views and past actions regarding cycling safety were public knowledge.
  • Above
  • we need segregated cycle lanes, not banning hgvs.  buses are also big and dangerous aren't they?  we have to feel safe to cycle, and at the moment that isn't the case, so it puts people off.  
  • having defined cycle lanes, perhaps also on pavements like in europe may help.  plus a cycle superhighway north to south, and east to west?
  • Raise awareness of the important contribution cyclists make to improve air quality in the city. Mount a campaign to properly penalise motorists who bully cyclists. Ensure london supports cycling by making it a safe and easy option. Create free secure cycle parking outside people's homes. Many cyclists have to contend with neighbours who disapprove of bikes being parked in front gardens. All homes must be built with designated cycle parking.
  • Remain in the public eye, championing our cause for safer cycling. 
  • Difficult one - there are several point above I could have picked.
  • As far as the mayor is concerned there's enough money (and TfL aren't able to spend it effectively anyway), there are proposals for HGVs in London already being consulted and a general move to back these.
  • That's why I think we should insist on having a set of segregated lanes *designed by continental designers or UK sustainable transport experts*, and NOT TfL: Having an area like this would hopefully (finally) provide an example of good provision we could hold TfL to for future (and also set a precedent of getting in outside experts).
  • segregated cycle lanes
  • Funding should at least match the proportion of journeys made by bike - if it's 2% then 2% of the transport budget should be spent on cycling infrastructure!
  • Lobby for more segregated cycle lanes, as well as more cycle sign posts
  • Cycling should not be seen as just marginal - ie always literally on the side of roads dedicated, essentially, to cars. And cycle lanes need to be continuous, so that one is not always being funnelled on to some dangerous, car-dominated junction where the cyclist is thrust into the dangerous business of changing lanes etc in a domain not intended for him/ her. 
  • Engage with Gilligan
  • Separate cyclists from motor traffic
  • Keep raising all the points above as they are all relevant ways of improving safety and are required in combination.
  • Having read much of the material on the internet, and elsewhere over the last few weeks, I am increasingly of the opinion that we need to drive for a change in the law w.r.t. to vulnerable road users, moving towards that seen elsewhere in Europe - strict liability - and a judicial system that recognises the rights of the vulnerable, and sentences accordingly.
  • I think that the list above is important, but without changes in the law, and a change in attitude of all road users, they are simply 'tinkering at the edges'.
  • You should push all the above issues, one at the time.But finalise the 20mph speed limits.
  • In the longer term, all the measures for increased safety are necessary. But to begin with, strictly as an interim measure, I'd like to see continuous cycle lanes painted on every road which does not already have a lane or path (with contraflows on one way streets). To make the point that we expect cycles on every road, and cars to give them space. Cycle lanes should take priority over parking, where space is limited.
  • One of the main reasons for cycling is to cut through congestion; even if it isn't as safe as a segregated lane, I'd rather have a painted line urgently than wait 5 years for something more expensive. Once we have lanes everywhere, then insist on more complex, safer designs.
  • Lobbying GLA
  • Direct action / protests
  • Histories of the Dutch campaign for good cycling infrastructure emphasise the role of dramatic protests. See video http://bicycledutch.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/how-the-dutch-got-their-cycling-infrastructure/ and especially the image at 3.42 minutes and 6.14 minutes
  • The Stop Killing Cyclists campaign is having success with this and I think it is the easisest/best way of effecting change. Here is my proposal to the LCC for a large-scale protest in London http://lcc.org.uk/discussions/great-2015-die-in-protest-and-london-cycling-festival
  • We really need wholesale change and a rethink of how cycling is integrated into the city. Failing that, though, getting rid of hgvs may make the biggest difference. It's also about education of car drivers, though. Cars are easier to dodge, but the attitude and behaviour of drivers is frequently shocking.
  • Work on the police so that they start from a position of assuming a vehicle driver is to blame in any collision with a cyclist (or pedestrian). Ideally this should be law (but given that we're talking London here). Coupled with a big driver awareness and education programme - as in the poster campaign across London last summer. There are physical things that can be done to make London safer for cyclists (getting rid of most of the existing cycle lanes for starters which do more to make cycling dangerous than safe), but without taking lanes out of Euston Road and causing massive traffic problems (which for the moment will not be accped), the most important thing is to focus on vehicle driver behaviour and getting to realise how vulnerable cyclists are.
  • Get a list of plans Gilligan is going to do, point by point explaining each one out in much fuller detail.
  • Nearly all cyclists also need to learn that they should NOT cycle past traffic lights when they are RED.  They are a great danger to pedestrians who are trying to cross the road and cause a great number of accidents.
  • All the above but to continue to defend against reactive knee jerk attacks from politicians as hysterical devices to deflect their inadequacies. The pre Christmas police presence at junctions infantalising cyclists.  Why no call to ban music for pedestrians and cars ditto helmets?  (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07o-TASvIxY) surely all have impaired hearing.  And if sound is so important are we to ban deaf people cycling or driving?  As far as fining cyclists for not having pedal reflectors methinks this is a device to fill Borsis's coffers. 
  • segregated cycle lanes
  • Get on our bikes for all of the above for all of the above.
  • Push for more funding so that the same (necessary) high standards can be rolled out across all elements of the vision. Also need to get more influence on the boroughs that will deliver a lot of the vision.
  • Push the Mayor to commit to expenditure and promises made thus far. Keep having protests and keep cycling in the public eye.
  • Continue campaigning for funds to be committed to a sufficient network of segregated and/or on pavement cycle lanes. 
  • Most importantly the planning of an extensive segregated cycle lane network should be presented to cyclists for feedback as we are aware of the shortcomings in the current cycle lanes on our frequent routes. 
  • It is not a "superhighway" system that is needed but a comprehensive overhaul of the existing cycle lanes to incorporate curbs and avoid dangerous junctions where possible. 
  • Lobby for segregated cycle lanes like in Stockholm/Copenhagen.  London has narrow streets, but it also has plenty of streets. Some small streets (e.g. those already designated as cycle network streets) could be dedicated to bikes altogther - keeping cyclists away from cars/lorries and vice-versa.  Everyone could benefit!  Blue lines painted on a road are not sufficient protection from dangerous drivers.
  • Reduce road traffic by the most polluting vehicles (these also tend to be the most dangerous to cyclists i.e. HGVs and obnoxious drivers in tanks (or just really large cars.)) This would make it safer and the cleaner air and (and reduced noise pollution) would be a joy to all those in London - not just cyclists. 
  • We must have segregated cycle lanes from motor vehicles - using raised curbs as is the case on most of the continent. Cycleways must also be segregated from walking paths by a raised curb too
  • Increase the safety for cyclists through a stronger legal framework: speed limits, stronger penalties for drivers that injure or kill cyclists.  Take on the car lobby
  • keep the pressure on for segregation - the only way to minimise cycle vs. HGW/car incidents on major routes. All other options are less immediate
  • Raise awareness that the roads are meant to be shared by motorists and cyclists and each should treat each other with respect.  If a motorist hits a cyclist due to careless or aggressive driving they should not be let off with a "there but the grace of God go I" attitude that seems prevalent today.
  • Direct action to keep the issue in the public eye through media coverage.
  • keep the profile high on Gilligan  pushing for more detail and speedier implementation of cycle lanes & training of both cyclists & hgv drivers.
  • Focus on the one thing that has been proven to work, namely building a network of safe cycle routes that everyone feels safe using whether aged 8 or 80.
  • If you include every issue under the sun then it lets Gilligan, Boris etc. off the hook because they can talk about these issues and we never get anywhere. If you campaign on one issue then the discussion *has* to be about that. Look at the LCC with their Space for Cycling campaign.
  • encourage more police on the roads - policing cars and motor bikes in cycle boxes/lanes. policing jjaywalking pedestrians
  • The most important things right now are (roughly in order of importance):
  • - More safety equipment, cameras, mirrors etc. for ALL types of HGVs (do not exempt certain categories as at present) with heavy fines and bans for non-compliance;
  • - Banning HGVs entirely in central London during the day and outside of peak-time hours;
  • - Quality measures to improve the most dangerous junctions, pending the implementation of joined-up primarily segregated infrastructure;
  • - Cycle awareness training for all professional drivers, especially HGV and PSV drivers.
  • it will take time to get segregated cycle lanes so the next priority is to exclude HGVs from central London between 7 and 10 a.m. and 4 and 7 p.m.
  • Junctions are where most accidents happen and I think the LCC going dutch proposals are probably the best on offer but likely to be more than we can hope for in the short term. Therefore quicker and relatively cheaper options, based on the legislative timetables for these things and modifying planned infrastructural improvements would be banning HGVs in Central London with a view to doing so within the A406 and then M25 in the longer term (looong overdue) and also the introduction of, where possible, more on pavement or bounded roadside cycle paths which integrate clearly with pedestrian crossings (which should also be expanded again after last decades period of diminution) at junctions.
  • Act now
  • Segregated cycle lanes are the single most effective way to reduce perception of risk and, I would contend, actual risk for cyclists in the capital. I write as a resident of Camden which has almost the only segregated cycle route leading south into central London. Its existence got me back on my bike after years as a non-cyclist. I appreciate that on many traffic routes there isn't enough space to accommodate separate lanes for cyclists and motorists - but even a few more, strategically placed, would lure timid would-be cyclists back on the roads ESPECIALLY WOMEN. Mark my words, I've spoken to lots of women about this.
  • Also ban HGVs from central London, tackle traffic with a view to cyclists' safety and improving air quality (too many London children have asthma).
  • I think segregated cycle lanes would be fantastic but also cyclists should be trained to consider the safety of others and their own. Too many but themselves and others at risk through rash behaviour.
  • Campaign for more spending on cycle lanes, and keeping cars out of them....... better enforcement!
  • Campaign for safe cycle ways, segregated from traffic.
  • Awareness campaigns - keeping cycling in the news, not just when another cyclist is killed. 
  • I wanted to vote for the Mayor's cycling vision too.
  • Cars and lorries need to be separate from cyclists.  Pavements in London are often twenty feet wide or more, with kerb build-outs - these could be reduced to widen roads, thereby making room for a dedicated cycle lane, with a wall separating it from other traffic - not just a painted line on the road, which is next to useless.  Also banning HGVs from Central London is not practical, but they should be fitted with the full length mirrors anyway, so that they can see any obstacle.  But segregated cycle lanes are obviously the way to go.
  • Anything that increases the number of cyclists, and while I accept that HGVs are the most dangerous things on the road, it is the attitude of cars and motorbikes that puts people off. Let's have some prosecution of drivers who cause death or injury through reckless behaviour (most seem to get off scott-free), who threaten cyclists, shout abuse or get out for a fight. Let's see the police stop picking on cyclists for petty infringements. Let's encourage respect between all road users, rather than widen the divide. And let's ask that expensive projects like CS2 are done with proper consultation to ensure that infrastructure is both fit for purpose, and value for money.
  • I'd also like to see some figures published on what it would mean for London if we all got off our bikes and into cars. What would it mean for traffic? What would it mean for the queue at the bus stop? What would it mean for the NHS?
  • Short term, focus on infrastructure
  • Hold Gilligan and the Mayor to specific improvements AND their time scale and cost - The 913 million keeps being repeated but no one can find out its START date nor end date (except 10 years!?) AND how much of it has already been spent if anything.  We now know the cycle hire subsidy comes out of it and salaries, consultation fees etc so it can no longer be this repeated figure but NO ONE knows the real truth - it is all PR speak to suppress cyclist groups pressure - we need to know detailed truth about it - it is taxpayer money
  • Campaign for improved safety for cyclists across the city (segregated cycle lanes, more safety equipment on HGVs, etc) and this will encourage more Londoners to cycle and help turn London into a Cycling City of Amazingness!!!
  • Push for the creation of physically separate cycle lanes, and priority measures for cyclists at busy junctions and roundabouts. 
  • Physically separated could mean putting small barriers alongside existing lanes to prevent cars from encroaching. 
  • work on a way to separate cyclists from other vehicles using curbed segregated areas of road in the Dutch fashion.
  • Also, cyclists need not have any idea of the highway code and often only rely on common sense to navigate life threatening situations. This is not enough. Cyclists and other road users need to be equally aware of their responsibilities and conduct.
  • Push for commitment on infrastructure improvements
  • We need to figure out how the roads can be shared in ways that are safe for all stakeholders - part of this comes down to attitudes. The law needs to start penalising drivers who kill other road users - especially cyclists and pedestrians - as well as those who display a lack of duty of care towards fellow road users.
  • Campaign to ban HGVs during rush hours in Central London.
  • Improve the CS routes.
  • I think it is better to focus on Mandatory safety features for all HGVs rather than trying to ban them in central London. There also needs to be much better planning of cycle routes/lanes.  Even on the cycle superhigways there are terrible examples of parking spaces in the middle of cycle lanes; cycles lanes stopping just when cyclists are most vulnerable; inadequate cycle lanes next to extra wide pavements which are disproportionate to their usage etc..
  • Speak as one voice to show force in numbers, and not get segregated into minor issues.
  • The only way that cyclists will be safe on our roads is if they are segregated from motorised traffic. If that means turning some roads into cycle-only lanes, so be it. Having fewer motorists within the city limits will also vastly improve our air quality, so it's win-win. 
  • Keep pressure on, and not let the issue fall silent.
  • Banning HGV's would have a positive benefit on many people's lives, not just cyclists, so it may be easier to build a broad band of support for this.
  • Start campaign for total ban with back up position of partial ban (rush hours or weekends)
  • Awareness - teach people to be more alert to who is around them 
  • Ban HGVs in Central London, as above...
  • Another possibility is banning them only for certain periods, rush hours etc.
  • Campaign for a borough-wide adoption of the best Go-Dutch cycling infrastructure throughout the whole of inner and central London within a 5-year period, funded by 10% of their transport budget, coupled with retraining of their traffic engineers and planners in Go-Dutch principles.
  • campaign to have separate highways for cyclists with NO other vehicles on. if the mayor and gillingan is serious about getting people on bikes and making it safe, it's where we should focus our efforts.
  • Segregated cycle lanes means people feel safe to cycle and takes the pressure off the HGV problem as they are not in the same roadspace.  CS2 needs to be segregated so same issue.  20 mph limits means dealing with multiple local councils so best done as an election issue.
  • Simply, real, joined up designs that truly match international best practice. In other words, no more putting in a new route then tinkering over and over again with it later, plus an acceptance that most good designs will involve cutting motor capacity etc.
  • Push for proper segregated cycle lanes. Painting parts of the road blue is better than nothing but it still doesn't make cycling in London safe.
  • keep the public informed on what is going on and why it is important to get broader support 
  • I think more demos until there is actual movement on the issues raised and cycling is taken up as the important issue it is.. it cuts across so many issues - health, environment, economics that it needs to be taken far more seriously. 
  • Lobby lobby lobby, until the government creates safe cycle lanes in cities
  • Keep up the pressure to fund segregated cycle ways in London and elsewhere. Keep the spotlight on fatalities and accidents of cyclists. Keep people up to date with statistics of cyclist and pedestrian deaths and injuries on our roads including cause of death and who was at fault and circumstances of death or injury. Segregated cycle lanes are important but in the meantime speed limits need to come down to 20mph, CS2 infrastructure needs to be improved and HGV's need to be banned and ultimately redesigned to avoid blackspots.
  • Without segregated cycle lanes and the extra infrastructure this demands, cycling in London will continue to be more dangerous than it need be and this dissuades people from taking up cycling in London.  As you know, the more cyclists on the roads, the safer roads are for cyclists.
  • Complete the planned Cycle Scheme routes plus extra with improvement.
  • Push to pass a law similar to Holland whereby drivers are held accountable for all collisions involving cyclists.
  • This should help slow the fatality rate whilst a more robust long-term plan can be developed and implemented.
  • Keep the pressure on Boris
  • Campaign for segregated cycle lanes and banning HGVs in London
  • Make roads without potholes.  Make roads without cars.  Why does every road have to be accessible by a car?  
  • I like the 20mph idea because it has benefits for many other people besides cyclists, pedestrians, shops, residents, and gets the message across to drivers that they are not the most important road users. They will likely have less stressful and overall faster journeys, rather than racing to the next set of red lights. Especially if more drivers take up cycling because they can see it has become safer, things who continue to drive for essential reasons will gain from reduced traffic.
  • Space for Cycling, LCC's 2014 local election campaign, requires grassroots campaigning and local action. If we all support this, the noise made and potential for change will be enormous.
  • Better safety at junctions - can cycle lanes go over/under junctions?
  • Try to get junctions made safer
  • Look at ways to keep cyclists and traffic segregated as much as possible in the future. More training for both cyclists and HGV drivers. Also for road awareness for everyone! 
  • Continue to campaign to improve cycling infrastructure and safety. Cycle lanes and policing of their use by non-cyclists is vital.
  • Big up cycling.
  • Link up with the London Cycling Campaign and the Local London Green Parties (the latter are pushing for 20mph speed limits in and around London).
  • (Lewisham, Camden, Islington, Hackney, Waltham Forest especially).
  • Getting cyclists (and pedestrians) respected as road users and not second to motorists 
  • Push for strict liability laws
  • Educate everyone.  I'm not a cyclist but I'm pro cycling.  I was nearly hit by a cycle on a pedestrian crossing on Abingdon Street this evening.  Its not the first time and I'm fed up with some cyclists thinking the rules of the road don't apply to them and cycling around as if they're in the Tour de bleeding France.
  • An organised awareness campaign, get more cyclists wearing cameras and collecting footage and data.
  • Definitely think that the campaign would work best by with a single pithy, resonating focus (Think "We are the 99%", not lengthy several-point manifestos. 
  • One of the major influences behind the change in Dutch transport policy was the “Stop de Kindermoord" ("Stop the Child Murder") campaign. This has a very clear focus. In four words it makes a statement that is emotional, tangible, resonant, and focused. Child deaths on the road are unacceptable, bad transport policy is to blame, and we need to do something about it. That’s the kind of statement a politician can - or can be forced to - wrap their head around. My hope is that the "Save Our Cyclists" campaign garners this kind of focus, and that the focus is a 20mph limit.
  • Training for all motorists about how to drive with cyclists.  Training for all cyclists about how to ride amongst motorists.  It's about awareness of where we are and where those around us are.
  • If pushing for segregated cycle lanes could realistically get them built, I'd say focus on that (if I'm right in understanding that that's the best thing for safe cycling). Otherwise, maybe a couple of focuses on smaller, more-achievable-in-the-short-term aims. 
  • Posh for steps to be taken to make all HGV's safer and meaningful enforcement to secure this. 
  • Help to raise awareness of cyclists needs so drivers are more considerate and less aggressive
  • I think it's about getting greater financial commitment from the Mayor for consistently, segregated cycling lanes.  
  • Baning HGVs at rush hour, also changing traffic lights so bikes can pass through on red whilst giving way to traffic and pedestrians.
  • look to see how other cities deal with the bike/traffic problem and create new scheme
  • For the safety of cyclists it is absolutely necessary to have cycle lanes.   Britain lags behind many ciuntries in this respect.   In Cairns, Australia the local authority have plans to install  safe space for cyclists by installing a curb at the edge of the cycle lane.
  • All the above issues are important for the safety of cyclists and should be pursued with vigour.
  • Consider campaigning for safer, separate bike lanes, and campaigning for more car-free areas in central London.
  • keep the matter in the public eye and press the Mayor hard.
  • Training cyclists and drivers, as well clamping down people breaking the rules of the road.
  • The more people who cycle the more the issues will be understood and heard.  Therefore social groups for cycling will be a powerful source of lobbying in the future.
  • I feel nothing less than a complete system of travel will address the issue of safety.  This may need to differ from Amsterdam in having some roads for cycling and some for vehicle traffic.
  • Also an aligning with the interests of pedestrians will be very fruitful (as a pedestrian myself)
  • Slowing the traffic wouldn't really slow progress of the traffic but would make it safer for cyclists and reduce noise in residential areas.
  • Police should carry on actively monitor junctions and drivers/cyclist behaviour and punish misbehaviour!
  • Get the traffic police or whoever to enforce the 20 mph speed limits which are already in force. Most drivers seem to ignore these, along with ignoring the basic rules laid down in the Highway Code, like indicating!
  • Banning HGV's which kill the most people on the streets and segregated cycle lanes would save the most lives IMO.
  • get the Mayor's Cycling Vision implemented properly and speedily
  • The long term solution which would encourage more people to cycle is to build Dutch-style separate cycle lanes. I admit this would make journeys slower for cyclists in some cases; but it would make such an improvement to our quality of life, not having to watch out for mistakes and thoughtlessness by other road users. From an environmental point of view we need to seriously increase the percentage of people who regularly use bikes around London, and this will only happen if people feel safe.
  • Start at the root and train HGV drivers, while also providing larger segregated cycle lanes for cyclists. 
  • Campaign for segregated cycle lanes as well as CCTV cameras on HGVs
  • Push for general road quality improvements and better scheduling for road works. 
  • Road works squeeze road users together and create additional hazards (not least of which are the many fallen road work barriers, signs and general rubbish).
  • Road surface quality is becoming quite hazardous for cyclists in many areas of London. There are many alarmingly large potholes and exposed drain covers etc. that are difficult to avoid on crowded roads.  
  • When so much attention is already required to look ahead and behind in order to anticipate what's likely to happen next and to monitor road works and traffic lights and to keep an eye on other potentially hazardous road users (lorries, busses, taxis and, sadly, other cyclists) there's not much bandwidth left to also watch out for wheel traps!
  • Make sure Gilligan knows cyclists want to see results in the next year, and the years to come.
  • Encourage all your signatories to support the LCC's #Spaceforcycling campaign by emailing their local council candidates and going on the Big Ride on Saturday 17th May